Fake news

September 7, 2017
Facebook blocks Pages sharing fake news from buying ads

Facebook blocks Pages sharing fake news from buying ads

Facebook will try to stem the spread of fake news, even if it means cutting off some revenue. Facebook will block Pages that repetitively publish posts flagged as fake news from buying ads on the social network, the company announced on Monday. “If Pages stop sharing false news, they may be eligible to start running ads again,” Facebook product managers Satwik Shukla and Tessa Lyons wrote in a company blog post. Facebook already prohibits pages from buying ads that link to articles flagged as fake, through a process involving third-party fact-checkers that Facebook enacted earlier this year. But that policy didn’t wholly prevent fake news publishers from using Facebook as a way to drive traffic, since they could still buy ads linking to non-fake articles on their sites. Now Facebook is extending the penalty. After being criticized for fueling the rise of fake news leading into last year’s presidential election, Facebook has been stepping up its efforts to tamp down that spread. In addition to working with outside companies like ABC News, PolitiFact and Snopes to confirm or dispute links’ veracity, Facebook has kicked fake news publishers out of its ad network and banned advertisers and Pages that try to camouflage links in ads and posts that violate Facebook’s rules. References Ha, A. (2017, August 28). Facebook says Pages that regularly share false news won’t be able to buy ads. Retrieved from Tech Runch: https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/28/facebook-fake-news-ads/
February 10, 2017

Don’t be fooled by fake news

Social media, for better or worse, is a part of 21st-century culture and it’s has been deeply ingrained in the daily lives, experiences and viewpoints of Americans of all ages.  Millennials and new generations don’t know a world without Instagram, Facebook and Google.  Intersecting daily with social media networks it’s simply their reality. Social media connects users across the world, allowing them to share ideas, thoughts, and content. While the dangers of social media are prominent in teachings to youth, the entire spectrum of what exactly is dangerous may not be covered. Students are warned of the consequences of posting scandalous photos or inappropriate comments. However, there are other important concerns to take into consideration when it comes to social media communication. One of these important social issues is the fact that many people are getting badly influenced by “fake news”. As a result of this concerning trend, some social networks are taking action. Now, Facebook is letting its users flag news stories as fake or a hoax and working with fact checkers to vet them, it is the first effort to address fake news since the United States election. Facebook stated on Dec. 15 that it is taking steps to weed out “the worst of the worst” fake news from its platform. So, be responsible, get educated and don’t believe everything you read in social media platforms. Always check with reliable sources first before sharing any news.